• How to make apple cider vinegar

    Homemade apple cider vinegar, ACV, is so easy! I just love turning trash into treasure, and this apple cider vinegar recipe is great example of that. Start your ACV: We simply take our apple scraps (normally after making juice), including the peels and cores and put them in a large glass jar. We then cover the scraps with filtered water and cover the jar with some paper towel secured with a rubber band to keep out bugs and dust. We then put it in a warm, dark place. You want a temperature of 15-27°C. Fermentation occurs more quickly at a warmer temperature. Some people add sugar or honey to kick start the…

  • Infographics: Sprouting

    We almost always have something sitting on our bench sprouting away! Here is a small infographic we did up about sprouting: There are many methods of sprouting – you can buy a special sprouter, use a clay sprouter, a special jar with a mesh screw on lid, or keep it simple like we do by reusing a glass jar and attaching a piece of tule with a rubber band. 🙂 The process is really very easy! It’s just a matter of firstly soaking the seeds (see the appropriate time for the specific seed below), then keeping them moist by rinsing them often to avoid mould and exposing them to sunlight…

  • Infographics: how to make coconut milk at home

    We are so happy with how our homemade coconut milk turns out. While we can get fresh coconuts we won’t buy the canned stuff anymore! This is what we discovered through this process: one coconut = 400mL coconut water, 1L coconut milk and lots (maybe 1kg) of coconut pulp!! 🙂 Also, we are pretty lucky here to get such a range of food. Did you know that Bolivia contains 40% of ALL animal and plant life in the world (called biological diversity or biodiversity). Its tropical rainforests and Pantanal Wetlands are some of the most biologically abundant ecosystems in the world. … Read the rest “Infographics: how to make coconut…

  • Infographics: how to make yellow mustard at home

    We’ve been posting infographics on our Facebook page, but for those of you who do not use Facebook, we’re glad to introduce you to the first infographic that we share on this blog. We try to ‘make sense of things’ and share our experiences by using clear, succinct images. We hope you find them useful! … Read the rest “Infographics: how to make yellow mustard at home”

  • How to make sauerkraut and cultured vegetables at home

    Recently we’ve tried making our own sauerkraut. It’s so incredibly easy and healthy that it seemed silly not to try and of course, share it with you! This post shares two methods – with salt and with whey. The kefir whey version is quicker to ferment and ready for eating. What is Sauerkraut? Sauerkraut literally means ‘sour cabbage’ in German – it is naturally fermented thinly sliced cabbage. It has a distinctive tangy flavour and is often used on hot dogs, as a condiment to meals but also much more… as an ingredient in soups, salads and sandwiches too, for example. Its flavour and preservation is a result of lactic…

  • How to make cottage cheese at home

    In addition to butter, yoghurt and brie, we’ve loved making cottage cheese at home too. It’s so easy we almost don’t want to tell people.  We normally use 2L of Cleopatra’s raw cow’s milk, removing the cream and putting it aside to make our butter.  To remove the cream simply leave your milk standing upright in the fridge so the cream can naturally separate from the milk – you will see a definite line.  Once separated, just make a small hole at the bottom of the bottle, take the lid off the top of the bottle and let the milk drain from the hole in to a separate jar.  When it has…

  • How to make yoghurt at home

    Yoghurt is our weekly must make product.  We usually use 2L of Cleopatra’s raw cow’s milk (including the cream on top), heat it to 85° C then let it cool to 43° C. Since raw milk is illegal to sell for consumption in Australia, Cleopatra’s raw milk is sold as Bath Milk, for cosmetic purposes only… but if you aren’t “brave” enough to use raw milk or can’t get a hold of it, just buy some organic pasteurised unhomogenised milk (see the UPDATE at the end of this post for more information). We then add 2 grains of the yoghurt culture… we got ours from cheeselinks.com and chose the type…

  • How to make butter at home

    We love our cultured butter!  And actually it’s really easy to make! We simply ferment some fresh raw cream (off the top of our raw milk) by leaving the cream on the kitchen bench until little bubbles start to form – around 24-48 hours. The lactobaccilis bulgaricus bacteria that’s naturally found in the cow will induce the ferment.  You can’t really see the bubbles in this picture because they are pin head size! Once the cream is fermented, we put it in the fridge as it’s easier to work with when cool.  Once cool we simply whiz it with a cake mixer (a food processor would be easier but we…

  • Homemade Christmas

    MERRY CHRISTMAS EVERYONE!! Check out the goodies we made as gifts for Christmas! Click on a photograph to read the tag better 🙂 Leave This Blank:Leave This Blank Too:Do Not Change This:Your email: … Read the rest “Homemade Christmas”

  • How to make brie cheese at home

    Recently we’ve been making a fair bit of brie cheese.  We’ve been using the Cleopatra’s raw cow’s milk (including the cream on top!).   4L makes 3 good size brie cheese wheels. We simply heat the milk up to 32°C in a big sterilised pot, add in a mesophilic starter (the culture – a couple of grains), the penicillum candidum (this is the white mould that grows on the outside – a couple of grains) and the rennet (1/4 teaspoon mixed in just less than 1 tablespoon water), stirring in an 8 shape for around 2 minutes.  Then we leave it, off the heat, for around 45 minutes.  (note: please check…

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