• How to make kefir at home

    When we were doing our cheese making course back in 2010, Elisabeth Fekonia gave us some kefir grains to take home.  So we’ve been using these friendly microorganisms and yeasts to help balance our inner ecosystem and supply complete protein, essential minerals and vitamins B12, B1 and C. It is also an excellent source of biotin, which helps the assimilation and absorption of other B vitamins from the body. Kefir has all the great health benefits of yoghurt and more, because whilst yoghurt works through a bacterial conversion of the milk sugars, kefir uses both bacterial and yeast actions! Kefir is full of probiotics while the calcium, magnesium and phosphorous from the milk…

  • How to make cottage cheese at home

    In addition to butter, yoghurt and brie, we’ve loved making cottage cheese at home too. It’s so easy we almost don’t want to tell people.  We normally use 2L of Cleopatra’s raw cow’s milk, removing the cream and putting it aside to make our butter.  To remove the cream simply leave your milk standing upright in the fridge so the cream can naturally separate from the milk – you will see a definite line.  Once separated, just make a small hole at the bottom of the bottle, take the lid off the top of the bottle and let the milk drain from the hole in to a separate jar.  When it has…

  • How to make yoghurt at home

    Yoghurt is our weekly must make product.  We usually use 2L of Cleopatra’s raw cow’s milk (including the cream on top), heat it to 85° C then let it cool to 43° C. Since raw milk is illegal to sell for consumption in Australia, Cleopatra’s raw milk is sold as Bath Milk, for cosmetic purposes only… but if you aren’t “brave” enough to use raw milk or can’t get a hold of it, just buy some organic pasteurised unhomogenised milk (see the UPDATE at the end of this post for more information). We then add 2 grains of the yoghurt culture… we got ours from cheeselinks.com and chose the type…

  • Is organic food elitist?

    Dear readers, although the current post can be read in and for itself, please note that it is a continuation of our two previous posts “Why we’ve decided to stop buying food from supermarkets…” and “Who is the ‘authority’ that said that Coca-Cola was safer to drink than raw milk?” So, let’s consider whether organic food is elitist. First let’s ask the question, is cheap food really cheap? Yes, we understand that an industrialised jam sold for $3.50 is cheaper than an organic jam sold for $5.70, but behind the price tag, one needs to also consider the ‘hidden’ costs of industrial food. Let’s, for instance, consider the environmental costs. According…

  • Who is the ‘authority’ that said that Coca-Cola was safer to drink than raw milk?

    In  a previous post, we shared why we’ve decided to move away from industrialised processed food and stopped buying food from supermarkets. For instance, we recalled that as far as our hormones and metabolism are concerned, there’s no difference between a bowl of unsweetened corn flakes purchased in a supermarket and a bowl of table sugar… So what does it have to do with the present post, i.e. ‘who is the ‘authority’ that said that Coca-Cola was safer to drink than raw milk?’ The question stems from the fact that the cola drink, which is an unhealthy drink if one looks at its proportion of sugar (or worse, sucrose or…

  • Why we’ve decided to stop buying food from supermarkets…

    It took me some time to realise just how unhealthy the food I’ve consumed for most of my life actually is – yeah, you know the food bought in supermarkets, not even fast-food and junk-food. I’ve been a bit naive this whole time but I think I’m now getting a better understanding of it all. I want to share with you just a few of the things I’ve discovered, but please research for yourself what you are eating too. Recently a network of French associations released a study, and its results are pretty scary – yet concern anyone living in an industrialised society. The aim of the study was to understand what…

  • How to make butter at home

    We love our cultured butter!  And actually it’s really easy to make! We simply ferment some fresh raw cream (off the top of our raw milk) by leaving the cream on the kitchen bench until little bubbles start to form – around 24-48 hours. The lactobaccilis bulgaricus bacteria that’s naturally found in the cow will induce the ferment.  You can’t really see the bubbles in this picture because they are pin head size! Once the cream is fermented, we put it in the fridge as it’s easier to work with when cool.  Once cool we simply whiz it with a cake mixer (a food processor would be easier but we…

  • How to make brie cheese at home

    Recently we’ve been making a fair bit of brie cheese.  We’ve been using the Cleopatra’s raw cow’s milk (including the cream on top!).   4L makes 3 good size brie cheese wheels. We simply heat the milk up to 32°C in a big sterilised pot, add in a mesophilic starter (the culture – a couple of grains), the penicillum candidum (this is the white mould that grows on the outside – a couple of grains) and the rennet (1/4 teaspoon mixed in just less than 1 tablespoon water), stirring in an 8 shape for around 2 minutes.  Then we leave it, off the heat, for around 45 minutes.  (note: please check…

  • Story Time – The Story of Soil continued

    Hopefully you will remember a previous post on the Story of Soil which describes how agricultural practices have evolved to today’s dependency on fertilisers, pesticides, herbicides and fungicides. Today I have a few follow up topics about this partially thanks to your contributions.  The first is regarding the debate on whether organic can feed the world, the second is regarding oxygenating soil and the third is about learning from the past. Can organic feed the world? According to this article (and my own views), yes organic can feed the world but we need to change how we eat and farm.  Last week Australian television held a debate about organic food,…

  • Story Time – The Story of Soil

    Throughout my Permaculture journey I hear some incredible stories.  A few of them help me enormously.  By simplifying them I feel they are easier to share and can still have a massive impact on the way people think – or simply remind them of the basic connections they have lost in life. So, today’s story is the story of soil. Once upon a time (around 10 000 years ago actually) humans, likely to be living somewhere in the fertile belt, started ploughing their crops as an experiment.  Agriculture was born! They noticed that their crops now grew even faster and bigger than before and were probably quite excited and proud…

Copyright © 2019 . All Rights Reserved. Created by Blog Copyright.