• Bolivian Story: Gabriela Rebeca Santa Cruz

    We met Rebeca the same night as Pablo, at Red Monkey, the only vegan vegetarian restaurant in La Paz. Rebeca was behind the bar mixing unusual cocktails that combine typically Bolivian ingredients like huacataya and locoto with fresh juices and of course, alcohol. When I turned up at Red Monkey for my first day volunteering in the kitchen Rebeca showed me around their food production garden, which is her baby and love. As we talked it became clear to me that she was feeling overwhelmed as the only person working in the garden, so I suggested I come one day a week to help out. It wasn’t a completely selfless offer, I…

  • Bolivian Story: Pablo Santa Cruz

    We first met Pablo in his restaurant, Red Monkey. Within weeks of it opening we were there – eager to try some healthy, vegan food in this city of meat and fries! Looking down the menu I was impressed to see kombucha listed and gave a little shriek. I thought we were the only ones in La Paz to be making kombucha :).  Pablo came over to our table, curious about my enthusiasm, and before long I was sharing our culinary images from Making Sense Of Things and Pablo had invited me to do a ‘guest chef’ evening there. Whilst I haven’t had the confidence to take up his offer,…

  • Bolivian Story: Pablo Antelo

    One day, whilst volunteering at vegan restaurant, Red Monkey, I met Pablo Antelo. He had been asked to help out in the kitchen for the day since the chef/owner of Red Monkey was a little tied up with welcoming his baby girl into the world. That day I was so surprised and happy to see this young man, laid back but enthusiastic, never idle, taking initiative and working hard. He impressed me. I loved his attitude. I told him about my friends who were opening a wine bar, called Hallwright’s, which would be showcasing Bolivian produce. I explained that they had asked me to make some products for their platters like…

  • Week 4 at Cob Camp – Hard work and fun

    This week started with Marco and Linda departing camp and Anita and Martin making a real effort to progress the project positively and constructively. A real highlight of the week was when Laurence came to camp to give us an edible weeds tour of our area. She taught us how to identify what we could eat that was naturally growing around us and how we could eat it.  She pointed out blackberries, wild sage, Jerusalem artichoke, daisies, yarrow, hog weed and more… here are some pictures… Fitting in with this theme, Wayne decided to teach us all (in a humorous TV cooking show style!) how to make delicious elderflower cordial…

  • Week 2 at Cob Camp – Planting, rescuing, cooking and eating food. And making stuff out of leather…

    Week 2 of the cob building course was (nearly) all about FOOD!! Planting food, skip diving for food, cooking creatively, making a stove and oven, eating, discussing… it really seemed to be our focus all week! After our first skip dive at the local supermarket bin, we organised the camp kitchen and enthusiastically embraced communal cooking with our rescued food. We made scrambled eggs, with smoked salmon and goats cheese, frittata, salad nicoise, salsa, potato salad, creamy pesto pasta, coleslaw, ratatouille, couscous, nettle and goats cheese quiche, garlic pizza bread, chocolate brownies, spaghetti and more… but the best creation all week was Sunset Bin Crumble with Sam’s Special Sauce. This cob-camp…

  • Researching Permaculture in London

    Well, we arrived in London and immediately started researching local farmers markets so we could continue avoiding supermarkets.  That turned out to be relatively easy thanks to London Farmers’ Market – all food and products are grown and produced within 100 miles of London. Some produce is organic, which is my preference when purchasing.  This is a great way to meet local farmers but I wanted to find out more – so, this post is simply about sharing some of the Permaculture groups, initiatives and sites in London (UK) that I’ve been researching. We are currently living in Zone 2 in West London and I have found it a challenge since…

  • Few days at the farm…

    A few days ago, CJG and I were invited by Elisabeth Fekonia to spend few days at her farm, in order to give her a hand with the garden and the animals. We accepted gladly as we knew that in addition to being helpful, we’d also learn a lot. Indeed, Elisabeth is the person who taught us how to make homemade brie, cheddar, cottage cheese, butter, ghee, sour cream, yoghurt and kefir – all of this in a one day workshop only! But she also knows how to make sourdough bread, miso, saurkraut, rennet, soap (out of pig fat), sponge (out of the luffa vine), as well as how to…

  • Contest! Guess who are these smallest-eggs-ever from?… There is a prize for the winner!

    Check this out – our flatmate just found these eggs behind the books on her shelf. To give you a better idea of the size, we’ve added a 50 cents coin by their side… So what kind of eggs do you think these are?… Leave us your answer in the comments, and we’ll offer a surprise to the first who provides us with the right answer 🙂 Come back in few days to get the answer!… UDPATE: We have a winner here! In addition to the comments visible hereunder, we’ve also received a number of emails – but all provided wrong answers though. So the correct answer is given by…

  • Yuk!… How long do you think you can keep a McDonald hamburger without it decomposing?

    So, how long do you think you can keep a McDonald hamburger on your shelf, without it decomposing? 2 hours? 8 hours? 2 days? 2 weeks perhaps? Nope, you are still far from the truth… Believe it or not, according to Karen Hanrahan, you can keep it for 12 years! And counting! As you can judge by yourself on the picture below, it looks exactly like a fresh one… The hamburger on the right is from 2008; the one on the left is from 1996. So let’s make sense of that. We know that any food decomposes rather rapidly right? Think of leaving your bread on your kitchen bench. It goes…

  • Is organic food elitist?

    Dear readers, although the current post can be read in and for itself, please note that it is a continuation of our two previous posts “Why we’ve decided to stop buying food from supermarkets…” and “Who is the ‘authority’ that said that Coca-Cola was safer to drink than raw milk?” So, let’s consider whether organic food is elitist. First let’s ask the question, is cheap food really cheap? Yes, we understand that an industrialised jam sold for $3.50 is cheaper than an organic jam sold for $5.70, but behind the price tag, one needs to also consider the ‘hidden’ costs of industrial food. Let’s, for instance, consider the environmental costs. According…

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