2. Ecology

It aims to tackle environmental-related issues – help us!

  • How then shall we live in this world of (climate) change?

    (This is my latest article, co-written with Dr Richard Hil from The Activist Think Tank – Ngara Institute, and first published in the Echo Publications) The intersecting crises of anthropogenic climate change and destruction to biodiversity and ecological systems have ushered in an age of acute anxiety in which people are beginning to seriously question whether life on Earth, in its current form, can be sustained. There’s an increasing sense that the planet and everything on it are in serious trouble. So, here we are, having to face up to a significant body of credible scientific knowledge that suggests some kind of end, or at least a radical reconfiguration of life as we…

  • Climate change – what can WE do about it?

    Climate change is real, and is already having devastating impacts on our planet, our wildlife and on humanity. The future looks dire, and it’s an understatement to say that climate change, alongside, and including biodiversity loss, is the challenge of the century. This said, we are not just doomed yet. We do have a short window of opportunity to act, in order to slow down the effects of climate change and, perhaps, in the future, reverse some of them. The task seems overwhelming and cynics, deniers, and doomsayers may be discouraging, but this is what we can do. It all comes down to ‘mitigating’, ‘adapting’, and, yes… ‘surviving’ – but…

  • Climate change – are we really doomed?

    As you probably already know, the 2015 Paris Agreement on climate calls for a limitation of a 2°C increase above pre-industrial levels of the average global temperature – and preferably 1.5°C – recognizing that “this would significantly reduce the risks and impacts of climate change.” According to the latest report from the Inter-governmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), we will be reaching the 1.5°C threshold increase around 2030 if we continue to live ‘business-as-usual’. To avoid this, we have around 11 years to – drastically – change the course of climate change. While the IPCC recalls that “[c]limate-related risks to health, livelihoods, food security, water supply, human security, and economic…

  • Has the end of the world started?

    Hammered by daunting climate change related headlines Recent news headlines in Australia and beyond are daunting. While northern Queensland has been battling with a “once-in-a-century flooding”, Tasmania is facing a “historic event”, an “unprecedented” “fire crisis”. Meanwhile the recent Australian droughts may have been the worst in 800 years. The Australian Bureau of Meteorology (BOM) announced that January 2019 was Australia’s hottest month since records began and that climate change “contributed to soaring temperatures”, which followed an already “record-breaking December”. Heatwaves don’t solely make us feel more sick, agitated or lethargic. They kill en masse. “Over two days in November, record-breaking heat in Australia’s north wiped out almost one-third of…

  • No more bombs

      I now live in Australia but I’m French. I’ve lived several years in Paris where many of my friends and family members still live. Two of the attacks occurred in the same street where by my best friend lives. His partner’s sister was enjoying drinks with her friends in one of the restaurants were so many people got killed on this tragic Friday the 13th. Luckily she survived.  I was touched by the outpour of solidarity I have received, my warmest thanks to you all. I read lots of articles and watched heaps of media about the Paris attacks. Yet, I started quite rapidly to feel uncomfortable at the world’s focus on…

  • How to make no-dig gardens

    A few weeks ago I built some no dig garden beds in our new home that we are renting and planted them out with small cuttings and seedlings. After living in Bolivia for the past 2 years, growing at altitude and indoors, in pots, I am excited to back at sea level in the sub tropics, converting grassed areas into abundant food production gardens. Here, my plants are growing so fast that I feel like I should be able to see them gaining height real time. This is how I built my no dig gardens: Each layer is around 10cm thick but it all settles to a height of approximately 20cm once finished. When…

  • This changes everything

    Today I’d like to introduce you to Rohan Anderson, if you don’t already know him. Rohan Anderson is the blogger, photographer, writer, cook, forager, grower and hunter from Whole Larder Love. If you don’t know of him, you should check out his website which details his journey from eating processed food, obesity, anxiety, depression and allergic reactions to ditching his career, growing, hunting, preserving, curing and foraging his food. Despite his inspiring, creative and very real life, recently I’ve read some criticisms of Rohan which have got me thinking. People don’t like him ‘constantly bashing supermarkets’ and complain that not everyone can live like him and his family. Whole Larder Love frequently…

  • Bolivian Story: Gabriel Coimbra, bringing nature to urban Bolivians

    I met Gabriel whilst volunteering at Red Monkey, a vegan restaurant in La Paz, Bolivia. At first I knew him as the guy washing dishes and tidying up but I soon learnt that there was so much more to this young man from the Amazon! One day he gave me some soapnuts he had collected… I hadn’t seen these since we were living in Europe, in the eco stores. I was so excited to use them to make soapnut liquid as an all purpose cleaner and natural pesticide for the white flies on my tomatoes. Another time I tried his Andean wild herbs bath salts as well as various other…

  • Galápagos Islands: remarkable yet preoccupying

    We enjoyed last Christmas on the Galapagos Islands, giving ourselves the soulful gift of connecting with nature. We felt incredibly blessed to be in such a unique place on this remarkable planet of ours as animals approached us unguarded, unafraid of humans and as curious about us as we were of them. We wondered at the unique giant tortoises, tame sea lions and abundant bird life. Our visit was bitter sweet though, as we noticed the effects of tourism and the swell in population on the islands. We wondered if we should really be there, contributing in that way. Locals profess that tourism funds conservation and research but I couldn’t help…

  • Suburban food gardening in Perth, Western Australia

    Over the past year I’ve been following a facebook group called Jetto’s Patch, a Perth edible garden on less than half an acre (1482 square meters). Admittedly, my involvement in the group has been minimal as we’ve been in Bolivia gardening in a completely different environment. I’ve quietly sat back and read posts, information and advice from people all over the world but I’ve been specifically interested in Dario and Michele, who nurture their abundant garden with passion and research. Friends of ours in Perth have found Jetto’s an inspiring and deep resource for their own budding suburban food garden. Over the years they have struggled to find local information…

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