I’m sick and tired of International Women’s Day

Posted on 08 March 2015

Today is International Women’s Day. I know we should celebrate this event but the truth is that I’m not in the mood for it. I’m a man, and I’m sick and tired of hearing horrible stories whichever part of the world I travel to, about how badly and unfairly women are treated in their respective society.

 

I’m sick and tired to know that 35 per cent (35!) of women worldwide have experienced either physical and/or sexual intimate partner violence or non-partner sexual violence.

I’m sick and tired that there are fewer women at the helm of top Australian and US companies than men named Peter or John sitting as chief executive and chair positions.

I’m sick and tired that good men all around the world are so much the slaves of their sexual desire that they end up groping, catcalling, lacking respect, hurting, hitting or raping a woman (or a girl or a boy or another man for that matter) because of it.

I’m sick and tired that some men tell me that ‘there is no sexual violence in my village’ but when I confront them with an actual case they answer ‘this doesn’t count, it happened within the family’.

I’m sick and tired that women aren’t given the same salary rates than men in the same position.

I’m sick and tired to know that 700 million women alive today were married as children.

I’m sick and tired that in so many countries, when a woman is raped, she is being treated as the guilty person and is hurt even more because of it.

I’m sick and tired that girls and women can’t grow up and live happily because they feel too fat or too ugly or too insecure.

I’m sick and tired to know that between 40 and 50 per cent of women in European Union countries experience unwanted sexual advances, physical contact or other forms of sexual harassment at work.

I’m sick and tired that some men will laugh at this blog post because they are victims of their false sense of manhood.

I’m sick and tired that, in the West, most toys for girls are pink and princess-oriented and most toys for boys are black and blue and action-oriented.

I’m sick and tired that 30% of women who have been in a relationship report that they have experienced some form of physical or sexual violence by their partner.

I’m sick and tired that so many men think that women aren’t capable of doing this or that, or believe that women are more emotional or less rational than men.

I’m sick and tired that women around the world are hidden away because men can’t control their impulses.

I’m sick and tired that sexists jokes are considered harmless.

I’m sick and tired that some women are such victims of this all, that they consider it normal to be raped or hit by their husband.

I’m sick and tired to know that my partner, my mum, my female friends, and women all around me don’t feel safe in their daily lives. That they have to think of what to wear because we men can’t see their dignity and humanity for who they are, not for how they dress.

 

Women feel at risk, because they are.

 

We men, don’t have to protect them. We have to behave.

Picture I took in February 2015, of a woman in the village of Ngandajika, DRCongo.

Picture I took in February 2015, of a woman in the village of Ngandajika, DRCongo. A strong sense of dignity emanates from her, despite her living conditions. Note that the only clothes drying belong to her husband…

 

Honestly, I just don’t get it. How do we accept this? Today we celebrate International Women’s Day, but we really should be celebrating ‘Wake Up Men’s day’. Like yesterday and tomorrow.

It’s really up to us men, to stand up and denounce any form of discrimination against women. To raise our boys and girls in respecting each other. To listen to women’s daily ordeal. To live by example.


 


10 responses to I’m sick and tired of International Women’s Day

  • Suzy says:

    This text full of sincerity should be translated into all langages of the planet!
    It should be part of the global, pedagogical materials,
    It should be commented in school and training programmes,
    It should become an official UN publication!
    Bravo Jean!

    [Reply]

    Making Sense of Things Reply:

    Thank you very much Suzy, please feel free to pass it on 🙂

    [Reply]

  • Thank you Jean, appreciate this voice of concern and overdue reflection and hope all man speak up like this, i know my man does…

    [Reply]

    Making Sense of Things Reply:

    Yes I hope too. We have to! Much love to you Ash

    [Reply]

  • Sharon says:

    Wonderful posts. Reading blog entries like this is why I’ve seriously considered taking up blogging myself. I want to be able to evoke emotions in my readers just like you have in your entry with me. I look forward to reading more of your work.

    [Reply]

    Making Sense of Things Reply:

    Thank you very much Sharon, your comment was really touching. Have you started your blog since? If so, we’d love to have a look to it 🙂

    [Reply]

    Sharon Reply:

    Yes I did. You can find the link by clicking on my name. It is called Citadel of Thoughts. 🙂

    [Reply]

    Making Sense of Things Reply:

    Great, we’ll have a look, thank you 🙂

  • Lucy Roberts says:

    Love it all, but for one point. Often women really are more emotional, and men more rational (but not always, of course). For me this is not a problem, just a difference. Rationality has its limits, as does over-emotionality. We need both. Men & women can balance each other beautifully here. I do think girls are (more often) naturally drawn to dolls & pink & caring for things than (most) boys. Boys are more often drawn to action-oriented games & toys. Again, not a problem but a very natural, healthy pre-disposition. I don’t want men & women to be the same, but I most definitely want them to have equal value, respect & right to safety.

    [Reply]

    Making Sense of Things Reply:

    Thank you for sharing your thoughts and insight, Lucy. x

    [Reply]

  • Leave a Response to Lucy Roberts

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